Thank U. Next.

If there’s one thing that I’ve learned over the last few years, it’s that everyone has their own opinion of what’s “best” for you. This has become glaringly apparent in both my personal life and my professional life as I left a marriage I was alone in, I moved to a city that wasn’t “home” and I left a steady career I was miserable in to follow my passion for entrepreneurship and real estate.

I thank God every day for the second chances I’ve been given and the strength he’s given me to trust in him and myself.

Most-recently I’ve hit a stumbling block in my business: people who’ve known me think that this career isn’t living up to my potential. It’s a hard pill to swallow when you learn that someone you’ve cared deeply about feels this way and that they won’t be supporting you in your career, after all, it must just be a faze anyway, right?

Actually, no. And I’m sorry that your definition of success is so narrow.

I became a Realtor to utilize my strengths in understanding law, finance and economics to be of service to those around me. I support my clients through difficult personal transformations and represent their interests in a logical, compelling and legal way to get them their best possible outcome. I use my strengths in negotiating and understanding of legal and ethical pitfalls of this industry to navigate families through the homeownership process all while caring for my clients’ interests as I would my own family’s.

Many of the people who started out as my clients have become what I consider to be my “Charlotte tribe” and “Charlotte family.” My clients have returned my care, loyalty and support to me in ways that I simply can’t explain in writing. They are the people who get to experience me in my every day life (the good, the bad, the ugly and the unexplainably hilarious).

I love meeting new people and allowing them the space to be themselves. I love getting to know these new people and new families, and I love letting them get to know me. The REAL me. The audacious, quick-witted, take-no-crap from anyone, nerd, that loves a good dog meme, non-political and intelligently lead debate, glass of bourbon and explosive laughter.

It saddens me that there are family and friends that don’t want me to be successful because they believe that my life is “beneath” what it should be. Because happiness and helping others while enjoying my co-workers, friends and everyday life without a six-figure salaried 9-to-5 job is somehow failing. Thank you for your concern and please know that your opinion has been heard. I just don’t care what you think my life “should” be.

I work hard and I’m surrounded by amazing people. I’ve lived through some craziness and I’m better because of it. I’m happier, healthier and more confident in myself than I’ve ever been. I’m sorry you’ve chosen not to support me, but I’m not sorry that I’m still standing and living in my own authenticity.

 

 

 

 

 

… Because, people.

When I made the jump from the cozy confines of corporate America to the Great Unknown of real estate, I thought about how I could best use the skills I’ve gained through experience and education. I never thought that my greatest passion and excitement would be fueled by the people I get to meet and help each day.

After just a few short weeks in production, I’ve written two contracts. And in both cases I have been blessed to represent and connect with some AMAZING people. After telling family and friends about each transaction I realized that I was more excited to talk about the people my clients are, how I helped them, and the quirks and stories that I learned about them than I was to talk about the house, the money or anything else.

The homebuying process is emotionally heavy, especially with buyers up against a definitively seller-centric market like Charlotte. It never crossed my mind that those involved in the transaction would be craving to connect on a personal level with those across the table. I had heard stories about how investors were getting every decent property by coming in with an all-cash offer, however I’ve now been the part of two transactions were the decision came down to “who?” instead of just “how much?”

I’m choosing to set aside the question of “Does revealing details of the parties potentially violate fair housing laws?” and choosing to see the good in people connecting on a real, emotional level. How people can see themselves in the party across the table and the opportunity that a home has given them, and the opportunity that it will give to another family. As long as my clients feel completely comfortable, and understands that they are under no obligation to discuss non-business matters with the other party, I choose to be in awe of the gentle, human element that I’ve been lucky enough to witness during these first few weeks.